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Aleka Drakopoulou

Soloist, Soprano
She was born and raised in Thessaloniki. At first, she trained with Piroska Liontas and, subsequently, she received her diploma with Dimitris Chasapidis. She gave concerts in many parts of Greece and recorded with the Thessaloniki Radio. She collaborated with the GNO on several occasions, the first of which occurred during the 1958/59 artistic season. Up until 2001, she had appeared in approximately 90 productions and/or revivals, interpreting leading and supporting roles, including, among others: Nedda [Pagliacci], Mimì and Musetta [La bohème], Theodora [Kassiani by George Sklavos], Donna Elvira [Don Giovanni], Cio-Cio-San [Madama Butterfly], Floria Tosca [Tosca], Desdemona [Otello], Poppea [The Coronation of Poppea/L’incoronazione di Poppea], Mrs. Alice Ford [Falstaff], Giulietta [The Tales of Hoffmann/Les contes d'Hoffmann], Phaedra [Kostas Karyotakis], Sophie [Werther]. She participated in the GNO first presentations of the works: Dialogues of the Carmelites [Dialogues des carmelites] (Sister Mathilde), Boris Godunov (Xenia), Anna Bolena (Giovanna Seymour), The Freeshooter [Der Freischütz] (Escort), Conroy and His Copies [O Konroua kai oi kopies tou] by Periklis Koukos (Girl), The Child and the Spells [L'enfant et les sortilèges] (Chinese Cup), Lily on the Seashore [Krino st' akrogiali] by George Sklavos (Island Girl), Maria Golovin (title role), The Queen of Spades [Pikovaya dama] (Masha and Chloe), and The Valkyrie [Die Walküre] (Waltraute Valkyrie) in a concert presentation. She appeared at the Odeon of Herodes Atticus in the context of the Athens Festival as Anna [Nabucco] (1958/59, 1959/60), Xenia [Boris Godunov] (1963/64), Ines [The Τroubadour/Il trovatore] (1981/82) and A Priestess [Aida] (1990/91), as well as at the Ancient Theater of Epidaurus as First Lady-In-Waiting [Medea] (1960/61). She also interpreted solo parts of the works: Farewell [Apochairetismos] and Contrasts [Antitheseis] by Thanos Mikroutsikos (Athens, European Capital of Culture, 1985), Symphone No. 4 and Medea by Mikis Theodorakis (first performances, 1987 and 1991 respectively).